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LESSON 14


Cumberland Gap (MP3 TRACK 24)
Here is the old time fiddle tune "Cumberland Gap" which makes use of many of the same licks and techniques as are found in "Cripple Creek". Notice that the "thumb-pinch" lick in the first and last measure is actually picked with the index finger followed by the pinch. This is unusual, but must be done since the four note roll before it ended on a thumb note. Also, watch out for the pull-off at the end of measure 3.


cumberland gap banjo tab

Notice the repeat signs at the beginning and end. This means to play all four measures twice. If you listen to Earl Scruggs pick this tune (and I hope you will) you will hear him play lots of nice variations of this tune.


If learning to play using tablature is giving you fits try my Play Banjo By Ear video course:

play the banjo by ear

These 5 video lessons (over 2 hours total) might be just the thing to make it all "click" for you. I have discovered that not everyone's brains operate the same way. For some people, especially in the early stages of learning, printed tab and chord charts just looks like "chicken scratchin'" and TAB just gets in the way of learning. These videos are a "monkey see, monkey do" method and you should try it and see if it works for you.

Click here for complete information.



Four New Rolls (MP3 TRACK 25)
Here are some new rolls to become comfortable with. In future songs these rolls will appear over and over again.


four banjo rolls


You will find that banjo players call rolls by lots of different names. The names used above are just one author's way of keeping track of some of them. After you have been playing a while you will not think much about which roll you are playing--certainly you won't think of them by name. In general "forward" rolls are played "t i m" and "backward" rolls are played "m i t".

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